We got you mama!

We are aligning our knowledge, resources and efforts to name and repair the impact of racism and inequality on the health of women, mothers and children in our city. We recognize that healthy pregnancies and births are deeply connected to our lived experiences and opportunities.

We want to center the voices, experiences and solutions of Black and Pacific Islander women in our efforts to ensure that every birth in those communities is healthy. Join us and make your voices heard.

On this page you will find:

*These resources are fam approved! Black and Pacific Islander birthing people have been to and checked out these resources themselves and recommend it four our mamas.

We have to be unapologetic about centering black women in our work and acknowledge that black women have the answers.

- Angela Doyinsola Aina, MPH, BMMA, @doyinspeaks, @BlkMamasMatter, #TrustBlackWomen -

Fam-Approved Resources

These resources are intended to provide information about pregnancy related tools, labor and birth support, postpartum care, and assistance for life beyond birth. Click each category below to find out more.

Make Your Voice Heard-Add to our Community Resources!

Know about a resource that would benefit our community that you haven't seen on our site? Tell us about it!

Pre-Term Birth - We Need You To Know

Did You Know....

In San Francisco, racism and birth outcomes are intertwined. Black and PacificIslander (PI) families experience adverse birth outcomes at significantly higher rates than other communities. Before a Black or PI child sets foot in the world, he or she is affected by historical and ongoing discrimination in housing, employment, care. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, 2018) identifies care. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, 2018) identifies he literature increasingly indicates that exposure to interpersonal, institutional and structural racism is the true risk factor (Braveman, 2017; Collins, 2004; IOM, 2007; Oparah, 2018).

Provider Resources

Race Equity 101 Toolkit

Expecting Justice designed the Race Equity 101 Toolkit to be used as a menu of tools to integrate racial equity into your existing practices. The tools in this document are organized by Government Alliance on Race and Equity’s “Normalize, Organize, Operationalize”framework from GARE and Race Forward’s”Actions to Advance racial Equity”.We recognize that change can take time, and often needs to be incremental. We also recognize that we need to operate with a sense of urgency and start somewhere.Each tool in this document can be applied to ongoing work in government agencies; we all need to self-reflect, cultivate our workforce, develop communication skills, improve quality of services, and hire or engage with HR. if we cannot apply a racial equity lens in these everyday activities, when do we start prioritizing racial equity? This work starts here, and it starts now.

HEART Up SF - coming soon

For the past 2 years, our team has been developing and piloting anti-racist trainings and tools tailored for providers, public health administrators, and institutional leaders. Our trainings were met with enthusiasm, but due to our small staff size we cannot be available to train everybody.

As we look to create an online resource to help us scale, we recognized that most online racism trainings offered at workplaces are framed as “implicit bias” and do not address structural issues. These online modules are cold, unengaging, and do not show people how to practice being anti-racist.

Expecting Justice is expanding the reach and impact of our race equity training initiative, Health Equity and Anti-Racism Training Up San Francisco (HEART Up SF), to increase racial sensitivity among providers, public health professionals, and institutional leaders who interact with pregnant people. HEART Up SF will help participants develop an understanding that racism is at the root of health disparities, increase self-efficacy to engage in racial dialogue, and cultivate a sense of responsibility to address racism and racial health disparities. These individual efforts will culminate into shifts in organization culture and ultimately in policies that lift up Black birthing